The Week That Was

9.25.17

“Happy Monday” is an oxymoron for many of you, but over here at TWTW headquarters we’re feeling psyched. Our favorite fall TV shows are finally starting back up and we’ve DVRed (yes, it’s a verb people) the Sanders-Klobuchar versus Graham-Cassidy Town Hall debate on CNN. Tomorrow night’s match-up is the equivalent of the Kanye vs Taylor showdown for healthcare nerds.

But before we head into a new week, let’s take a moment to reflect on the one we just wrapped. So grab a cup of coffee—maybe just not this one—and read on for The Week That Was.

► JIMMY KIMMEL AND THE LIE-DETECTOR TEST 

Congress goes back to work today, and not everyone is excited about what’s on the agenda; particularly late night comedian Jimmy Kimmel. Kimmel has become one of the most public critics of the new Obamacare reform effort introduced by the Senate duo Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and Bill Cassidy (R-LA). Kimmel railed against Senator Cassidy in not one, but two monologues on his show last week. In the segments, Kimmel takes a page out of the late, great political correspondent Tim Russert’s playbook, by holding Senator Cassidy to his own rhetoric. Kimmel played Senator Cassidy’s recorded comments on TV to show that the current bill language did not pass the Senator’s own “lie detector test” about good health insurance policy. Kimmel’s segments cover a lot of ground, but the below quote stood out: “Healthcare is complicated—it’s boring—I don’t want to talk about it. The details are confusing, and that’s what these guys are relying on. They’re counting on you to be so overwhelmed with all the information that you just trust them to take care of you. But they’re not taking care of you.”

► OUR TAKE

Kimmel may have summed up how a lot of Americans are feeling about healthcare and healthcare reform. It’s in the news week after week, and the general public may be growing weary of the debate. Regardless of a near constant dialogue, as healthcare communicators, we cannot become complacent about translating policy jargon into terms that matter to those we seek